Bush
Saturday, January 24, 2004
Listen

GK: This was the week of the State of the Union address. How did you feel it went, Mr. President?

TR (BUSH): Went pretty well.

GK: People seemed to like it?

TR (BUSH): People liked it fine.

GK: So I saw that you came out against steroids.

TR (BUSH): That's right. When you see a wrong you have to speak out. I wanted to talk about the designated hitter rule, but time didn't permit. And those scented perfume ads in magazine as well. You know the kind I mean? Man, they just stink up the place. And the new twenty dollar bills. They look like play money. But I had to focus on terrorism and foreign policy so I couldn't get around to that.

GK: You didn't say much about the moon program.

TR (BUSH): Well, it's a cool idea, and also it's very important to people in Florida and California, so that's what we're going to do.

GK: Some people question a big space program at a time when schools are cutting back and millions of kids have no health insurance.

TR (BUSH): It's important to make Mars safe for all Americans and that's what we're going to do.

GK: So how do you feel about the economy? Some things are picking up but the country has lost millions of jobs ----

TR (BUSH): That's true. I called up to complain about a perfume ad and I got a fellow in New Delhi. And that's why I'm proposing we cut back on the teaching of English because it's English that permits these people overseas to take our jobs.

GK: So you're trying to cut down on English?

TR (BUSH): I think that English has been used to confuse and weaken us and we need some controls over it.

GK: Many people comment that your English seems to be getting better and better.

TR (BUSH): Thanks. I appreciate that.

GK: So the speech went well?

TR (BUSH): Gotta get these athletes off steroids, and protect this country against terrorism ---- that is going to be my Number One focus between now and November, believe you me, and stemming the flow of English to other nations, and to stick to my message that we live in the greatest nation on earth and there isn't anything we can't do once we cut taxes enough so that we won't have the money to not do it with.

GK: Thank you, Mr. President.


Old Sweet Songs: A Prairie Home Companion 1974-1976

Old Sweet Songs

Lovingly selected from the earliest archives of A Prairie Home Companion, this heirloom collection represents the music from earliest years of the now legendary show: 1974–1976. With songs and tunes from jazz pianist Butch Thompson, mandolin maestro Peter Ostroushko, Dakota Dave Hull and the first house band, The Powdermilk Biscuit Band (Adam Granger, Bob Douglas and Mary DuShane).

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