P.O.E.M., October 12, 2013

The Saenger Theatre

New Orleans, LA


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P.O.E.M.

Listen (MP3)

-- after this word from the Professional Organization of English Majors.

GK: The Nobel Prize in Literature went to a Canadian short-story writer Alice Munro—and good for her, and now it's twenty years since an American won. Twenty years. How did we become the Chicago Cubs of world literature? I'll tell you why: it's the memoir. This is what American literature is now. It's all me, me, me. Confessional stories of self-confrontation and redemption. We are the most fortunate people on the planet and we create a literature of complaint.

(SENSITIVE PIANO)

TR (KIRK): I suffer from a rare mood disorder called Disorganized Affect Disorder, or D.A.D., which is helped by eating kale but not entirely. Every day is a battle to stay on an even keel. The key is forgiving myself. And forgiving my mother Judith who was a Jewish Buddhist and a nudist on Route 66 who fed us bamboo shoots and grapefruit juice.

GK: That's literature. If it's not about addiction or abuse or your dysfunctional family, it's about how you lost weight or found happiness by meditation or tai chi or living in Tuscany. This is not what the Swedes are going to give a Nobel Prize to.

TR (SWEDISH SOLEMNITY)

GK: The Swedish Academy wants writers to address the great questions of good and evil and fate vs. self-determination and what is reality----

(TR SWEDISH SOLEMNITY)

GK: And should herring be fried or grilled. And how can one be happy in the darkest months.

TR SWEDISH EMPHATIC

GK: GET OVER YOURSELVES.

TR SWEDISH EMPHATIC

GK: NOBODY CARES ABOUT YOUR PROBLEMS

TR SWEDISH MURMUR

GK: Better luck next time. A message from the Swedish Academy by way of the Professional Organization of English Majors.

HT:
Non parle inglese?
You gotta be crazy
Anglais--- tres chic
That's the language you want to speak

Old Sweet Songs: A Prairie Home Companion 1974-1976

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